My conviction was expunged. Does that mean it is gone for good?

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The expungement of a Florida resident's criminal record makes it, in most cases, erased from the individual's history. An expungement seals a person's record and generally makes it undiscoverable through basic background checks.

There are a number of situations in which a person's expunged record may come back to demonstrate evidence of prior criminal conduct. For example, if a person is subject to immigration or deportation hearings their expunged records may be used to show their prior criminal past. When an individual applies to certain government agencies for employment their expunged records may be opened to determine if they may be offered a position.

In most cases a person does not have to mention prior arrests or convictions on job applications, rental applications and other documents that require background checks if their records are expunged. There are entities, though, that have the legal authority to unseal such records in order to determine an individual's fitness for employment or other positions of trust or responsibility.

For many individuals a prior conviction or arrest is a bar to gaining a better job, a better place to live and a better future. Expungement may be a good option for them to pursue to have their records sealed so that new opportunities may be opened before them. Many factors can be considered when a person seeks the expungement of their criminal record, including but not limited to the crime or crimes they were arrested or convicted of, and the length of time that has gone by since their arrests or convictions.

Not every person who seeks the expungement of their record will receive it. To learn more about expungement and other options for having one's criminal past sealed, readers may wish to consult with criminal defense attorneys to better understand their individual rights.

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