DUI suspect literally goes kicking and screaming to jail

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The phrase "kicking and screaming" is often used metaphorically to describe someone who performs a task while expressing intense objection to it. A literal instance of the phrase recently occurred when Melbourne police arrested a woman on suspicion of drunk driving.

At about 1:30 a.m., a driver called 911 to say that she thought she saw a woman in an SUV driving recklessly. Melbourne police saw the SUV and pulled it over. Police allege that the driver had bloodshot eyes and slurred speech. They also allege that they found marijuana and cocaine in her possession. She allegedly failed a field sobriety test and was arrested for drunk driving. As officers attempted to place her in the police cruiser, she began to lash out.

According to the police affidavit, the woman attempted to hit and kick the arresting officers. She was restrained and taken to a nearby hospital. At the hospital, the woman allegedly screamed at the officers that she knew the "Melbourne mafia" and that they were going to take some kind of vengeance against the police for arresting her. The woman was later taken to the Brevard County Jail and charged with DUI, battery on a law enforcement officer and resistant arrest with violence.

The suspect in this case did not do herself any favors by failing to maintain her self-control. Her behavior led to an unnecessarily expanded list of charges, ones that could have serious consequences if she were to be convicted. A smarter course would have been to contact an experienced criminal defense attorney for advice. A knowledgeable lawyer could provide helpful advice on dealing with the police. A defense attorney could also evaluate the evidence and the strength of the evidence against her.

 

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