Bank fraud leads to double murder

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Bank fraud is generally regarded as the quintessential white collar crime, involving only paper transactions and no violence. This pattern was broken in decisive fashion by the recent arrest of an Orlando couple on first-degree murder charges.

The case began when a woman who worked at Chase Bank and her husband allegedly took advantage of an elderly man and stole $50,000 from him. The man had suffered a traumatic brain injury and was easily confused. Police allege that the banker and her husband pressured the man to request two cashier's checks for $25,000 each payable to their young son. The couple deposited the checks in the son's account and soon began spending the money.

A female relative of the elderly man learned of the two checks and confronted the Chase employee with her knowledge. Several days later, the bodies of the accusing woman and her son were discovered by police. According to the charging affidavit, the man was spotted standing outside the female victim's apartment shortly before the homicide allegedly occurred. The husband of the Chase employee allegedly purchased a handgun several days before the murders; the handgun is alleged to be the same caliber as the gun used to kill the two victims. The woman and her husband were imprisoned in the Orange County jail. They were charged with first degree murder and multiple fraud crimes.

The defendants in this case are facing very serious criminal charges. They could each face a lengthy imprisonment or even the death penalty. Anyone in a similar situation would benefit from consulting a capable criminal defense lawyer. A knowledgeable attorney can provide an evaluation of the evidence, suggest potential defenses and aid in negotiating a plea agreement.

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