Is the other parent getting in the way of your parental rights?

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Florida parents understand the importance of taking steps during divorce to ensure they maintain a strong relationship with their kids. Most parents agree that it is in the best interests of the children to allow them to have access to both parents after divorce, but some parents still have a difficult time acknowledging this. In some cases, parents can actually try to interfere in the other parent's visitation. 

When one parent strives to undermine the role of the other parent in the life of the child, it is parenting time interference. This is more than an inconvenience; it is grounds to take legal action. If you are a victim, you do not have to walk through the aftermath alone.

How do you know if you are a victim?

Parenting time interference can take many forms, and in extreme cases, it can be a criminal or civil matter. This happens when a parent does certain things to disrupt the child's relationship with the other parent, ultimately violating the custody and visitation order. Some examples of this type of interference include the following:

  • Indirect interference happens when a parent does things such as preventing communication with the other parent, speaking negatively about the other parent or keeping the other parent from attending important events for the child.
  • Direct interference can include physically preventing the child from seeing the other parent, refusing to return the child after visitation or moving without permission.

If you are a parent dealing with the ramifications of parenting time interference, you do not have to navigate this complex matter on your own. You have the right to seek a beneficial outcome to your situation. It may require legal support and guidance in order to reach a positive solution that allows you to maintain your relationship with your child. 

What can you do to fight back? 

There are some things you can do to fight back against parenting time interference. One thing you can do is seek help as soon as possible. It may be appropriate to take legal action against the other parent or seek enforcement of your custody order from the court.

It can be prudent to start with a complete evaluation of your case. This allows you to become familiar with your parental rights and how you can move forward to protect the important role you have in the life of your child.

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