Circumstances that may warrant changes in child support

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Children deserve to receive emotional and financial support from their parents. When parents live together, they often pool their resources to provide their children with the best care that they can as a united couple. However, when parents separate or divorce it can be more difficult for them to provide for their kids as they live in separate households.

In Florida, noncustodial parents can be asked to pay child support for the benefit of their kids. Child support is established based on the state's guidelines and may depend on a child's needs, a parent's income and other important case-specific factors. Over time, however, children may require more support as their needs augment and parents may lose their capacities to pay support as their incomes dwindle.

These are only some of the circumstances that may require courts to modify families' child support orders. If a parent simply cannot pay child support because they have lost their job or have been incarcerated due to a conviction on a criminal charge then their responsibility to pay child support may need to be changed until they are capable of earning an income again.

Similarly, if a parent's income substantially increases due to a raise, promotion or remarriage their child support obligation may increase as well. Generally, courts must approve modifications to child support orders and the parties may need to appear in hearings to discuss the changes that may affect the child support they pay.

If readers believe that their child support obligations should change, they are encouraged to get legal help from attorneys who advocate for their family law clients. Making changes to an existing child support order may allow a parent to continue to provide for their child even as changes in their own lives make doing so more challenging.

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